VITTI'S Home

LIFE IS A JOURNEY AND THOSE WHO TRAVEL LIVE TWICE

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VITTIS'S Home

For your stay in Verona guest houses and Bed and Breakfasts Our facilities:

VITTI'S HOME VERONA

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Villa Vitti's

VITTI'S

ABOUT US Information about our company

The Vitti’s home is a chain of guesthouses and bed and breakfasts located in the Veneto region that is growing and ready to welcome new ideas and proposals in the market. We specialize in tourist rentals by leasing or purchasing properties.

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Verona, Italy with the Arena

VERONA, THE CITY OF LOVE AND UNESCO HERITAGE

Verona is a city of history, culture, and worldliness, declared a UNESCO World Heritage site. It is famous worldwide as the home of Romeo and Juliet, but it also has much to offer: from a vibrant opera scene to traditional gastronomy, its urban and suburban areas are rich in cultural treasures. It’s a place of
great traditions that you can’t miss

Verona the most romantic city in the world From Vitti’s you can reach:

Over 4,600 exhibiting companies, more than 40 producing countries, 400 events in 4 days: technical tastings, prestigious vertical, walk-around tasting and focus on key markets.
Thematic areas dedicated to the certified organic wine Vinitalybio, international  production International Wine, the Ho.Re.Ca channel Vinitaly Tasting – The DoctorWine Selection, accessories and supplies for catering and sommeliers Vinitaly Design, and the 2020 novelty Micro Mega Wines – Micro Size, Mega Quality, which presents a selection of small-production companies, both indigenous  and international varieties, but of high quality.

From November 18th to December 26th, Piazza dei Signori and the streets of the city center host, for the 13th year, the characteristic wooden stalls of the Christmas Markets in Verona in collaboration with the "Christkindlmarkt" in Nuremberg.
The over 100 stalls of the Christmas Markets offer handmade products, gift ideas, and Christmas decorations made of glass, wood, and ceramics, as well as gastronomic specialties and delicious Christmas sweets. The entrance to the city welcomes visitors with special lighting to immediately immerse them in a
characteristic Christmas atmosphere. You then arrive at Piazza Bra where, with the Arena in the background, you can admire the giant Christmas Star. This structure is considered the largest archisculpture (a large metal sculpture) in the world, weighing 88 tons and standing at a height of 100 meters.
At the Gran Guardia, you can enjoy the exhibition "Nativity Scenes from Around the World in Verona." Visiting the Christmas Market in Verona means diving into the magical tradition of Veronese
Christmas, immersing yourself in a fairy-tale atmosphere where Juliet and Romeo, in this city of Love, can kiss under the mistletoe held firmly by Dante.

The story of Juliet and Romeo originated from the pen of Luigi da Porto, a nobleman from Vicenza, and was published as a novella in 1531. The Veronese setting was likely inspired by Dante's Commedia. In Canto XVII of Paradiso, Bartolomeo della Scala's lordship is mentioned, while in Canto VI of Purgatorio, the Montagues and Capulets, medieval families in conflict, are remembered. The Montagues were indeed an ancient and noble Veronese family involved in the factional struggles of the 13th century, while the Capulets were a Guelph family from Cremona, believed to be Veronese at the time of da Porto.

The story of Romeo and Juliet immediately began to circulate in Verona and was repeatedly reprinted and rewritten. In 1553, two versions were composed: one in prose by the famous novelist Matteo Bandello and the other in verse by the noble Veronese Gherardo Boldieri. It soon crossed the borders of the Italian peninsula. Known and appreciated in France, it then arrived in England where, in 1596, it was staged by William Shakespeare under the title "The Most Excellent and Lamentable Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet." The universal fame of Romeo and Juliet is owed to the immortal verses of William Shakespeare.

Around 1560, Gherardo Boldieri hypothesized that a medieval sarcophagus preserved in the garden of the Church of San Francesco al Corso (identified by Da Porto as Juliet's burial place) was the tomb of the young heroine. This marked the beginning of the Veronese 'myth' of Romeo and Juliet.

In the 18th century, Juliet's tomb was already visited by European travelers on the Grand Tour who began to question the existence of the Capulet house. After all, if there was a tomb, there must have been a house, and thus began the story of Juliet's House.

The story of Juliet and Romeo originated from the pen of Luigi da Porto, a nobleman from Vicenza, and was published as a novella in 1531. The Veronese setting was likely inspired by Dante's Commedia. In Canto XVII of Paradiso, Bartolomeo della Scala's lordship is mentioned, while in Canto VI of Purgatorio, the Montagues and Capulets, medieval families in conflict, are remembered. The Montagues were indeed an ancient and noble Veronese family involved in the factional struggles of the 13th century, while the Capulets were a Guelph family from Cremona, believed to be Veronese at the time of da Porto.

The story of Romeo and Juliet immediately began to circulate in Verona and was repeatedly reprinted and rewritten. In 1553, two versions were composed: one in prose by the famous novelist Matteo Bandello and the other in verse by the noble Veronese Gherardo Boldieri. It soon crossed the borders of the Italian peninsula. Known and appreciated in France, it then arrived in England where, in 1596, it was staged by William Shakespeare under the title "The Most Excellent and Lamentable Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet." The universal fame of Romeo and Juliet is owed to the immortal verses of William Shakespeare.

Around 1560, Gherardo Boldieri hypothesized that a medieval sarcophagus preserved in the garden of the Church of San Francesco al Corso (identified by Da Porto as Juliet's burial place) was the tomb of the young heroine. This marked the beginning of the Veronese 'myth' of Romeo and Juliet.

In the 18th century, Juliet's tomb was already visited by European travelers on the Grand Tour who began to question the existence of the Capulet house. After all, if there was a tomb, there must have been a house, and thus began the story of Juliet's House.

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